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NewXbo

We lose one to American

Vorhees HS (NJ) senior Kathryn Roncoroni chose American University over Lafayette College to continue her field hockey career. She holds the school record of 44 goals and 104 points for a single season. She also has 90 goals and 205 points going into this season. Additionally, she is currently number 4 in the nation in active career goals.

She selected American over Lafayette because she wants to major in elementary education.
Bogus Megapardus

Re: We lose one to American

NewXbo wrote:
She selected American over Lafayette because she wants to major in elementary education.

Well, she made the correct choice.  Lafayette does not offer "elementary education" nor will it ever.  Hundreds of former "normal schools" offer education majors.  Lafayette is geared toward much more rigorous disciplines.  We haven't the capacity nor the inclination to provide fluff.

I hope that never changes.
Andy

The more I learn about AU the more convinced I am that they should never have been admitted to the PL.  Never mind that they were allowed to compete in the league with scholarship players long before core members had even decided on the issue. Just a bad fit.
Lafalum

We actually have a large number of graduates who go to "Teach for America"
I believe we help our school by getting our graduates into the teaching profession. We have made it too difficult for many of our students to choose this life path. I also think its  a benefit to young students to be taught and mentored by a Lafayatte graduates.
There is a teacher shortage.
BPard

Lafalum wrote:
We actually have a large number of graduates who go to "Teach for America"
I believe we help our school by getting our graduates into the teaching profession. We have made it too difficult for many of our students to choose this life path. I also think its  a benefit to young students to be taught and mentored by a Lafayatte graduates.
There is a teacher shortage.
While a major in elementary education may be inappropriate at this point in time for the College for various reasons, there should be a way for well educated Lafayette College graduates to enter the teaching profession immediately upon graduation without post-college coursework.

We make it too goddamn hard to do so.

Quote:
Hundreds of former "normal schools" offer education majors.  Lafayette is geared toward much more rigorous disciplines.  We haven't the capacity nor the inclination to provide fluff.

I hope that never changes.

This attitude is a perfect example of why teaching is not taken as a serious profession in the United States.

The fact that somebody who is well educated and benefited from a top flight education, can think of the discipline as "fluff" is mind boggling.

It's almost like I'm listening to Lehigh graduates.
Lafalum

I knew a young athlete at Lafayette whose objective was to become a math teacher. Her parents were both teachers. She was a brilliant math major winning prizes at the college for her accomplishments. After telling her advisor that's what she wanted to do her professor advisor told her she was " wasting her talents" as a math teacher. She is teaching math today in high school and by all reports a credit to her school and her profession and has inspired several students to attend Lafayette!

( This is second only to the story I heard from a Lafayette graduate who is a specialist in equine reproduction. She is only 5'1" and was told by her professor advisor she was too short to be a horse vet. I guess its hard to take seriously anyone who has spent a lifetime in academia  )
bethlehempard

There used to be an "Ed Semester" option that included student-teaching locally. Maybe there still is.
Perhaps our good ranking in mid-career salaries is partly the result of the school not sending too many graduated into that field but those who tried it, enjoyed it.
RichH

BPard wrote:
Lafalum wrote:
We actually have a large number of graduates who go to "Teach for America"
I believe we help our school by getting our graduates into the teaching profession. We have made it too difficult for many of our students to choose this life path. I also think its  a benefit to young students to be taught and mentored by a Lafayatte graduates.
There is a teacher shortage.
While a major in elementary education may be inappropriate at this point in time for the College for various reasons, there should be a way for well educated Lafayette College graduates to enter the teaching profession immediately upon graduation without post-college coursework.

We make it too goddamn hard to do so.

Quote:
Hundreds of former "normal schools" offer education majors.  Lafayette is geared toward much more rigorous disciplines.  We haven't the capacity nor the inclination to provide fluff.

I hope that never changes.

This attitude is a perfect example of why teaching is not taken as a serious profession in the United States.

The fact that somebody who is well educated and benefited from a top flight education, can think of the discipline as "fluff" is mind boggling.

It's almost like I'm listening to Lehigh graduates.
RichH

BPard wrote:
Lafalum wrote:
We actually have a large number of graduates who go to "Teach for America"
I believe we help our school by getting our graduates into the teaching profession. We have made it too difficult for many of our students to choose this life path. I also think its  a benefit to young students to be taught and mentored by a Lafayatte graduates.
There is a teacher shortage.
While a major in elementary education may be inappropriate at this point in time for the College for various reasons, there should be a way for well educated Lafayette College graduates to enter the teaching profession immediately upon graduation without post-college coursework.

We make it too goddamn hard to do so.

Quote:
Hundreds of former "normal schools" offer education majors.  Lafayette is geared toward much more rigorous disciplines.  We haven't the capacity nor the inclination to provide fluff.

I hope that never changes.

This attitude is a perfect example of why teaching is not taken as a serious profession in the United States.

The fact that somebody who is well educated and benefited from a top flight education, can think of the discipline as "fluff" is mind boggling.

It's almost like I'm listening to Lehigh graduates.

While I certainly dont disagree with your position,highly unlkkely a Lehigh grad.would categorize Education as a fluff major. Our Education program is a well respected nationally.
pardfan

Daughter is LC '15 AB English   While she did have some choice in the matter,  Teach for America (very selective nationally) placed her in Cleveland. (You expected  Beverly Hills?)
Since TFA is the largest single employer (around 15) of Lafayette grads, I think we could and should make it easier to go that route if that is what some students want to do.  (Brad Bormann, former guard on football team and Pepper Prize winner, is TFA.)
She jumps horses many weekends in Gran Prix events to supplement income.
Leopard Loyalist

I don't know much about Teach for America, but if it is employing so many Lafayette grads, it doesn't seem as if not having an education background is a problem. In fact, isn't it part of the idea of TFA to draw in folks with a disciplinary background and a passion?
pardfan

Passion, etc. is important, of course; but, if you're not a go-getter and dot connector, the nuts and bolts of the TFA application can be a real pain.  The College doesn't lift a finger in the process.  For that kind of money, I (and all alums should, also) want the College's prints on all positive outcomes.
BPard

T4A is the # 1 employer for a lot of colleges nationwide.

Harvard's Career Services Muckety Muck said of T4A wrote:
students are not necessarily looking for a ‘career,’ but for their next experience.


Bormann is a prime example. He is going to med school after T4A, which is just a step on his journey.

If prospective students who are aspiring teachers look at Lafayette College and say "I won't go there," that reflects poorly upon the College, IMO.
bison137

Leopard Loyalist wrote:
I don't know much about Teach for America, but if it is employing so many Lafayette grads, it doesn't seem as if not having an education background is a problem. In fact, isn't it part of the idea of TFA to draw in folks with a disciplinary background and a passion?



No, it is a problem.  TFA mostly draws in non-teachers for a two-year commitment in a poor area.   However after you finish those two years, you won't have a teaching certificate in most states - unless you go to grad school while you are in TFA.
Leopard Loyalist

Yes, of course you need education credits in order to become a certified teacher. Getting those credits as an undergrad obviously speeds up the process. But in the long run might not aspiring teachers be better teachers with a deeper disciplinary background during their UG years?
Lafalum

After spending paying all or part of 240,000 dollars there may not be family resources to pay for grad school right away. Gettng credentialed as an undergrad allows you to work and go to grad school to improve your knowledge of your discipline. In fact many schools districts pay for grad school, but you must have teaching credentials first.
Why couldn't Lafayette offer a fifth year for that to happen?? I think we may be a little short sighted and not thinking what the real world demands. Many of our liberal arts faculty think it may make us too "vocational." They already think that of our engineers.
Andy

Lafalum wrote:
Why couldn't Lafayette offer a fifth year for that to happen?? I think we may be a little short sighted and not thinking what the real world demands. Many of our liberal arts faculty think it may make us too "vocational." They already think that of our engineers.


That seems a great idea, Laf, and with their LA education already accomplished, the "vocational" argument should be irrelevant.
BillS

Lafalum wrote:
After spending paying all or part of 240,000 dollars there may not be family resources to pay for grad school right away. Gettng credentialed as an undergrad allows you to work and go to grad school to improve your knowledge of your discipline. In fact many schools districts pay for grad school, but you must have teaching credentials first.
Why couldn't Lafayette offer a fifth year for that to happen?? I think we may be a little short sighted and not thinking what the real world demands. Many of our liberal arts faculty think it may make us too "vocational." They already think that of our engineers.
My daughter a 1993 Lafayette  American Studies major obtained a teaching certificate in California and taught school for 3 years before moving on to other ventures,so it can be done if you have a passion for teaching at that level.
bison137

BillS wrote:
Lafalum wrote:
After spending paying all or part of 240,000 dollars there may not be family resources to pay for grad school right away. Gettng credentialed as an undergrad allows you to work and go to grad school to improve your knowledge of your discipline. In fact many schools districts pay for grad school, but you must have teaching credentials first.
Why couldn't Lafayette offer a fifth year for that to happen?? I think we may be a little short sighted and not thinking what the real world demands. Many of our liberal arts faculty think it may make us too "vocational." They already think that of our engineers.
My daughter a 1993 Lafayette  American Studies major obtained a teaching certificate in California and taught school for 3 years before moving on to other ventures,so it can be done if you have a passion for teaching at that level.



But it depends on the state, whether or not you need to take a lot of additional courses at some other college.
Bogus Megapardus

You're in High School, enrolled in the AP Chemistry class, aiming for an elite college.  Would you rather your teacher had a B.A. in General Education or a B.S. in Chemistry?

Nothing wrong with aspiring to be a teacher.  It's a laudable goal in a stable and (often) well-paying profession.  You're passing on the education you received.  But if you're going to teach English, why not an English degree?  Teaching social studies/humanities?  A degree in Government & Law or Sociology seems much more substantive, IMHO.

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